A cluster randomised trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of physical activity practices in secondary schools: study protocol for scaling up the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) program

Rachel Sutherland, Elizabeth Campbell, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, David R. Lubans, Philip J. Morgan, Karen Gillham, Chris Oldmeadow, Andrew Searles, Penny Reeves, Mandy Williams, Nicole Evans, Andrew Bailey, Ross Morrison, Matthew McLaughlin, John Wiggers
  • BMC Public Health, July 2019, Springer Science + Business Media
  • DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-6965-0

“Physical Activity 4 Everyone” – a scaled-up recipe for more active schools!

Photo by Akshay Chauhan on Unsplash

Photo by Akshay Chauhan on Unsplash

What is it about?

We’ve actually trialled this program in schools before, and it was successful. It increased student’s physical activity amongst other positive weight and cost-effectiveness outcomes. But now we’ve scaled the program up for many more schools! The program involves seven ‘practices’ targeting: the curriculum, the school environment and partnerships with parents and the community. This protocol lays out the details of the program, and the planned evaluation.

Why is it important?

Up to 92% of Australian teens are inactive. Physical inactivity is on the rise in high income countries. We need action at scale! We’ve actually done this trial before and it was successful. But now we’ve scaled it up for many more schools!

Perspectives

Dr Rachel Sutherland
University of Newcastle

“I’m delighted to see this program scaled up, it’s one of very few programs that are effective in secondary schools.”

Professor John Wiggers
University of Newcastle

“The program was previously effective in 5 schools. But, we need evidence of programs delivered on a larger scale. As such, we’ve scaled up this program. It will be exciting to see the results due 2020”

Karen Gillham
Hunter New England Population Health

“Health services and schools need evidenced based programs. Physical Activity 4 Everyone has already been found to increase students’ physical activity, and so it was the perfect option for Hunter New England Schools.”

Read Publication

http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-6965-0

The following have contributed to this page: Matthew Mclaughlin, Dr Rachel Sutherland, Professor John Wiggers, and Karen Gillham