Chapter 7. Intercorporeal enaction and synchrony

  • The case of distance running together
  • Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, John Hockey
  • July 2017, John Benjamins
  • DOI: 10.1075/ais.8.07all

Running together in distance running - chapter in edited collection

Photo by Curtis MacNewton on Unsplash

Photo by Curtis MacNewton on Unsplash

What is it about?

At present, there is relatively little ethnographic research addressing the everyday practices of actually “doing sport” and specifically, “doing sport together”. To address this gap, here we offer an in-depth, analysis of training together for distance running. We focus specifically upon the sensory and interactional work we undertake, which constitutes an essential component in our experience of running-together. Employing sociological phenomenology as the theoretical framework, we draw on data from a collaborative project to explore and analyze in detail our various intercorporeal practices and processes, fundamental to the enaction of training-together for distance running.

Why is it important?

Whilst there exists a substantial literature providing abstract theories of sport, there is relatively sparse ethnographic research on the mundane practices of actually “doing sport” and specifically, “doing sport together”. This chapter addresses that gap in the literature, and focuses upon the sensory and interactional work we undertake as two runners (and sociologists) in order to achieve the often complex work of running together.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/ais.8.07all

The following have contributed to this page: Professor Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson