What is it about?

Weather experiences are currently surprisingly under-explored and under-theorised in sociology and sport sociology, despite the importance of weather in both routine, everyday life and in recreational sporting and physical–cultural contexts. To address this gap, we examine here the lived experience of weather, including ‘weather work’ and ‘weather learning’, in our specific physical–cultural worlds of distance-running, triathlon and jogging in the United Kingdom. Drawing on the findings from five separate research projects, we explore the ‘weather-worlds’ and weather work involved in our physical cultures. In so doing, we address ongoing sport sociological concerns about embodiment and somatic, sensory learning and ways of knowing. We highlight how weather learning is important across the meteorological seasons that contour our British weather-related training.

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Why is it important?

Weather experiences are currently surprisingly under-explored and under-theorised in sociology and sport sociology, despite the importance of weather in both routine, everyday life and in recreational sporting and physical–cultural contexts. This article seeks to remedy the existing gap in knowledge.

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This page is a summary of: Weather-wise? Sporting embodiment, weather work and weather learning in running and triathlon, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, March 2018, SAGE Publications, DOI: 10.1177/1012690218761985.
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