The Scutari Monument in Istanbul: the introduction of Victorian monumental language to Ottoman society

Kaan Sag
  • Sculpture Journal, November 2014, Liverpool University Press
  • DOI: 10.3828/sj.2015.2

The Scutari Monument in Istanbul

What is it about?

The Crimean War ended in 1856 with the Treaty of Paris. The Ottoman Reform Edict (Islahat Fermanı), which was proclaimed by Sultan Abdülmecid in the same year, was also acknowledged with the ninth article of that treaty. Henceforth, non-Muslims obtained the right of constructing and repairing their own religious buildings, schools, hospitals, and cemeteries within the frontiers of the Ottoman Empire. Following the edict, the first monumental edifice constructed by Britain, one of the allies of the Ottomans in the Crimean War, was the Scutari Monument. It was erected in Haydarpaşa British Cemetery, established for the fallen British soldiers in that same war.

Why is it important?

The principal aim of this paper is to introduce the Scutari Monument and its sculptor, Baron Marochetti, whose other works are also considered in a comparative manner. A preliminary assessment of the erection process of the Scutari Monument will also be made by exploring the role of this monument on the formation of the ‘Ottoman-monument’ practice in public spaces, including the erection of figural statues.

Perspectives

Mr Kaan Sag (Author)
Istanbul Teknik Universitesi

The principal aim of this paper is to introduce the Scutari Monument and its sculptor, Baron Marochetti, whose other works are also considered in a comparative manner. A preliminary assessment of the erection process of the Scutari Monument will also be made by exploring the role of this monument on the formation of the ‘Ottoman-monument’ practice in public spaces, including the erection of figural statues.

Read Publication

http://dx.doi.org/10.3828/sj.2015.2

The following have contributed to this page: Mr Kaan Sag

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