What is it about?

This article will propose a more authentic learning environment for students of the social sciences, one that is not only learner-centred but community-centred. Drawing on the principles of social pedagogy, cultural-based learning, place-based learning and co-production, this article advocates engaging community groups as co-producers in the generation of knowledge, enhancing learning within – and beyond – the university. By not using the community simply as a source of research data or placement opportunities, the curriculum is more likely to produce reflexive graduates better equipped to engage with complex global problems, enhancing their global citizenship and that of the wider community.

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Why is it important?

By not using the community simply as sources of research data or placement opportunities, a re-framing of the relationship between the university and the community could support reflexive graduates better equipped to engage with those living with social disadvantage, and contribute to a more inclusive and sustainable society

Perspectives

Having worked with disadvantaged communities in the voluntary sector in the past I am passionate about enhancing the voice of these communities, blurring the line between the service provider and service user; the researcher and the researched. Therefore by introducing students to the principles - and practice - of coproduction through the course of their studies is more likely to help them develop as inclusive practitioners, working co-productively with those communities.

Jane Booth
University of Wolverhampton

Read the Original

This page is a summary of: Becoming a global citizen?, Learning and Teaching, March 2021, Berghahn Journals, DOI: 10.3167/latiss.2021.140104.
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