Tourette syndrome research highlights from 2017

Andreas Hartmann, Yulia Worbe, Kevin J. Black
  • F1000Research, July 2018, Faculty of 1000, Ltd.
  • DOI: 10.12688/f1000research.15558.1

Research on tic disorders from 2017

What is it about?

We comment on 80 or so articles from 2017 about Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. This is the fourth annual installment in the TS research highlights series on the F1000Research Tics collection. Comments to the authors are welcome--email us for disagreements about the 2017 article, or nominate papers of interest for 2018 by commenting on our draft outline (http://bit.ly/TShighlights2018; hover over the right edge of a paragraph and click on the little balloon icon that appears).

Why is it important?

The scientific literature on tic disorders has been growing rapidly, from 1 PubMed article on Tourette's in 1963 to 200 per year for the past 5 years (see http://bit.ly/TShighlights2014). My colleagues and I discuss some of the reports that most interested us, ranging from natural history to genetics and brain imaging.

Perspectives

Dr Kevin J. Black
Washington University in St. Louis

I'm excited that my colleagues Andreas Hartmann and Yulia Worbe, from Paris, joined this year's "Highlights" paper.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.15558.1

The following have contributed to this page: Dr Kevin J. Black and Dr Andreas Hartmann