Information transparency: How do Department of Library and Information Science students at South Valley University perceive the state’s dealing with the novel coronavirus outbreak?

  • Essam Mansour
  • Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, October 2020, SAGE Publications
  • DOI: 10.1177/0961000620965687

How do DLIS students perceive the state’s dealing with the novel coronavirus outbreak?

What is it about?

This study proposes to investigate the knowledge and perception of students in the Department of Library and Information Science at South Valley University in Upper Egypt about the state’s dealing with the outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19 that has been detected in Egypt in February 2020. A quantitative research approach was adopted in the form of a survey. The target population of the study included students (N = 295) of the fourth year of Department of Library and Information Science at South Valley University, of which 253 responded to the study questionnaire, representing 85.8% of the total number. The study found that there is no significant relationship between the students’ gender and other variables of the study according to the statistics used. It also showed that the most popular information sources mentioned by Department of Library and Information Science students to get information related to the coronavirus were social media and the Internet/Web. The publication/dissemination of information and its availability were badly perceived by the students. About one-third of them questioned the government’s ability to deal with the novel coronavirus. They highly believe in the role of information transparency in fighting both administrative and human corruption. The students emphasized the citizens’ right to criticize the government when it does not comply with transparency, as well as the right to access any information owned by it in any formats at any time. They were dissatisfied with the government’s ability to retrieve information, organize, store, have legislations, and own a good database of citizens, as well as its capabilities, in terms of transparency, competence, benevolence, honesty, accuracy, efficiency/effectiveness, practicality, and confidence, in relation to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus. Finally, the study indicated that barriers, such as the spread of administrative and human corruption, security restrictions, and the fragility of the freedom to disclose government information, were highly significant by the surveyed students.

Why is it important?

The significance of this study derives from its important topic, which has occupied mankind over the past months amid uncertainty, apprehension, and anticipation, which can continue for a longer period of time in the absence of any successful treatment. In this study, this topic is addressed and handled in terms of the transparency of information that the government is following in its dealings with specialists in the study of information to expose their role in the dissemination of this virus in terms of origin, availability, distribution, transparency, organization, preservation, retrieval, as well as accessibility.

Perspectives

Professor (Full), Essam Mansour, Head of Department of library & information science (DLIS), SVU Essam Mansour
South Valley Univeristy (SVU)

Students, Governments, Policymakers

Read Publication

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0961000620965687

The following have contributed to this page: Professor (Full), Essam Mansour, Head of Department of library & information science (DLIS), SVU Essam Mansour

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