What is it about?

Pure and Objective Thinking; Interest and Desire is regarding what students may be thinking about during tasks and why, how student’s thinking affect student’s learning efforts and achievements, and what teacher must understand of student’s interest to help students to learn at their best efforts.

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Why is it important?

Pure and Objective Thinking; Interest and Desire is important because it helps to generate the language for discussing concepts of students’ interest. These terms were formerly so restricted that tendencies of interest and tendencies of desire were interpreted as the same. Here, in Pure and Objective Thinking; Interest, the concepts of interest and desire are explained in simple and plain language. Concepts of pure thinking, objective thinking, or appearance are discussed. How concepts of pure and objective thinking relate to students’ interest and desire are explained. Reading this article helps to differentiate interest from desire.

Perspectives

Reading Pure and Objective Thinking; Interest and Desire gives you opportunities to understand what your students may be thinking about during learning tasks and why. Learning about and understanding your students' interest/concerns is important; for, otherwise, the teachers might not know of students' direction of growth or be helping to maintain students' growths, and students do not respond well to tasks. Teachers want to understand their students’ concerns, help to inform students' concerns and thus help students to navigate their challenges and learn at their best efforts. Reading Pure and Objective Thinking; Interest and Desire gives teachers the opportunities to understand students’ interests and to develop creative strategies for helping students to learn optimally.

Dr. MARTIN ODUDUKUDU
New York Institute of Teacher Education

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This page is a summary of: Pure and Objective Thinking: Interest and Desire, SAGE Open, April 2019, SAGE Publications, DOI: 10.1177/2158244019844086.
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