What is it about?

This article examines the long-forgotten first book-length treatise on international law ever published by a woman in the history of international law. The first part places Concepción Arenal’s Ensayo sobre el Derecho de gentes (1879) in the historical context of the dawn of the international legal codification movement and the professionalisation of the academic study of international law. The second part surveys the scattered treatment that women as objects of international law and women’s individual contributions to international law received in international law histories up to the early twentieth century. It then draws many parallels between Arenal’s work and the influential resolutions of the first International Congress of Women in 1915 and surveys related developments during the interwar years. The conclusion highlights the need of readdressing the invisibility of women in international legal history.

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Why is it important?

This article examines the long-forgotten first book-length treatise on international law ever published by a woman in the history of international law.

Perspectives

It highlights the need of readdressing the invisibility of women in international legal history.

Prof Dr Ignacio de la Rasilla
Wuhan University

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This page is a summary of: Concepción Arenal and the place of women in modern international law, Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review, June 2020, Brill, DOI: 10.1163/15718190-00880a08.
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