Modeling signal propagation in the human cochlea

Stephen T. Neely, Daniel M. Rasetshwane
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, October 2017, Acoustical Society of America (ASA)
  • DOI: 10.1121/1.5007719

A theoretical study of inner-ear mechanics in the presence of short-duration sounds

What is it about?

One of the most salient features of auditory brainstem responses to transient sounds is that latency decreases as stimulus level increases. One of the most salient features of cochlear mechanics is that sharpness of tuning decreases as stimulus level increases. This paper suggests a modeling framework that reconciles these two experimental observations.

Why is it important?

Having a single theoretical framework to explain multiple independent experimental observations contributes to our understanding of the function of the inner ear.

Perspectives

Stephen Neely
Boys Town National Research Hospital

In 1988 I published an observation of auditory brainstem responses to tone bursts that revealed an extremely orderly pattern in their latency verses stimulus level and frequency. Since that time, I've been trying to understand the role of cochlear mechanics in producing this orderly pattern. This paper represents a breakthrough in my understanding of some signal-processing aspects of cochlear mechanics.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.5007719

The following have contributed to this page: Stephen Neely