Exploring a consumption value model for Islamic mobile banking adoption

Tiong Thye Goh, Norazah Mohd Suki, Kim Fam
  • Journal of Islamic Marketing, September 2014, Emerald
  • DOI: 10.1108/jima-08-2013-0056

Consumption value model for Islamic mobile banking adoption PLS Approach

What is it about?

The purpose of this study is to explore a consumption values model for Islamic mobile banking acceptance and to identify any differences in perceived consumption values between Muslims and non-Muslims towards the use of Islamic mobile banking services. Empirical results via the PLS method demonstrates that the result satisfactorily explains the adoption of Islamic mobile banking and further demonstrates the use of the consumption values model as an alternate approach for technology adoption. The consumption values model approach appears to have a stronger fit for Muslims than non-Muslims with 66.6 per cent of the variance explained and a goodness-of-fit index of 0.724. The conditional factors are important in the non-Muslims compared to Muslims. Muslims seem to value emotional factors more than non-Muslims.

Why is it important?

This research finding is useful as the comparison is made between Muslim and non-Muslim consumers which help practitioners and researchers to better understand the different adoption characteristics and advance insights on how to promote such a technological service for everyday banking needs especially to different segments of the community. In developing Islamic mobile banking interactions, designers should look beyond the system’s ease of use and take advantage of the different consumption values to include personalisation in the service design through automatically recognising Muslim customers and non-Muslim customers during system use. The study contributed to the theory of consumption values model in technology adoption and demonstrated the model is capable of explaining the functional, emotional, epistemic, conditional and social values on consumers in their adoption intention. This research provides empirical findings not reported in previous studies due to the overly represented technology acceptance model approach.

Perspectives

Professor Dr Norazah Mohd Suki
Universiti Utara Malaysia

The purpose of this study is to explore a consumption values model for Islamic mobile banking acceptance and to identify any differences in perceived consumption values between Muslims and non-Muslims towards the use of Islamic mobile banking services. Empirical results via the PLS method demonstrates that the result satisfactorily explains the adoption of Islamic mobile banking and further demonstrates the use of the consumption values model as an alternate approach for technology adoption. The consumption values model approach appears to have a stronger fit for Muslims than non-Muslims with 66.6 per cent of the variance explained and a goodness-of-fit index of 0.724. The conditional factors are important in the non-Muslims compared to Muslims. Muslims seem to value emotional factors more than non-Muslims. This research finding is useful as the comparison is made between Muslim and non-Muslim consumers which help practitioners and researchers to better understand the different adoption characteristics and advance insights on how to promote such a technological service for everyday banking needs especially to different segments of the community. In developing Islamic mobile banking interactions, designers should look beyond the system’s ease of use and take advantage of the different consumption values to include personalisation in the service design through automatically recognising Muslim customers and non-Muslim customers during system use. The study contributed to the theory of consumption values model in technology adoption and demonstrated the model is capable of explaining the functional, emotional, epistemic, conditional and social values on consumers in their adoption intention. This research provides empirical findings not reported in previous studies due to the overly represented technology acceptance model approach.

Read Publication

http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/jima-08-2013-0056

The following have contributed to this page: Professor Kim-Shyan Fam and Professor Dr Norazah Mohd Suki