Examination of peer influence as a moderator and predictor in explaining green purchase behaviour in a developing country

  • Norazah Mohd Suki, Norbayah Mohd Suki
  • Journal of Cleaner Production, August 2019, Elsevier
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.04.218

Peer influence as a moderator and predictor in explaining green purchase behaviour

Photo by D. Jameson RAGE on Unsplash

Photo by D. Jameson RAGE on Unsplash

What is it about?

This study examines the factors affecting consumers' purchasing behaviour in respect of green products in a developing nation. Additionally, it ascertains the moderating effect of peer influence on this relationship.

Why is it important?

Perceived deterioration of environmental problems was the strongest predictor of consumers’ purchasing behaviour in respect of green products in a developing nation. This was followed by environmental concern, and then by perceived environmental responsibility, and environmental self-image. Furthermore, the moderating effects varied significantly across peer influence groups. Producers and marketing managers should overtly demonstrate their sensitivity to the need to care for the environment. This requires them to arouse positive environmental awareness among consumers about the deterioration of environmental problems. The originality of the paper is its investigation of peer influence as the moderator and predictor in the proposed theoretical framework, something that has been overlooked in prior studies. The results underpin new and extensive inputs into marketing theory, and enlarge the emergent literature related to consumer green purchasing behaviour in a developing nation.

Perspectives

Professor Dr Norazah Mohd Suki
Universiti Utara Malaysia

This study examines the factors affecting consumers' purchasing behaviour in respect of green products in a developing nation. Additionally, it ascertains the moderating effect of peer influence on this relationship. A questionnaire was administered to a group of 400 respondents through the convenience sampling method. Data were analysed via the Partial Least Square-Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) approach to examine the posited research hypotheses. The PLS-SEM approach revealed that perceived deterioration of environmental problems was the strongest predictor of consumers’ purchasing behaviour in respect of green products in a developing nation. This was followed by environmental concern, and then by perceived environmental responsibility, and environmental self-image. Furthermore, the moderating effects varied significantly across peer influence groups. Producers and marketing managers should overtly demonstrate their sensitivity to the need to care for the environment. This requires them to arouse positive environmental awareness among consumers about the deterioration of environmental problems. The originality of the paper is its investigation of peer influence as the moderator and predictor in the proposed theoretical framework, something that has been overlooked in prior studies. The results underpin new and extensive inputs into marketing theory, and enlarge the emergent literature related to consumer green purchasing behaviour in a developing nation. Directions for future research are offered.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.04.218

The following have contributed to this page: Professor Dr Norazah Mohd Suki and Assoc. Prof. Dr. Norbayah Mohd Suki