Release of Immunomodulatory Ebola Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Microvesicles Is Suppressed by Tetherin in a Species-Specific Manner

Julia Nehls, Ramona Businger, Markus Hoffmann, Constantin Brinkmann, Birgit Fehrenbacher, Martin Schaller, Brigitte Maurer, Caroline Schönfeld, Daniela Kramer, Stephan Hailfinger, Stefan Pöhlmann, Michael Schindler
  • Cell Reports, February 2019, Elsevier
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.01.065

Virosomes interfere with Ebola virus control by the immune system

What is it about?

We show that the Ebola virus glycoprotein can be incorporated into non-infectious particles, termed virosomes. Virosomes can serve as antibody decoys and modulate macrophage function. The Interferon induced antiviral host cell protein tetherin inhibits virosome release.

Why is it important?

Our results show that virosomes can interfere with immune control of Ebola virus. Moreover, our findings indicate that tetherin may interfere with Ebola virus spread in two ways: Blockade of release of viral particles and virosomes. Finally, our findings may have implications for antiviral strategies. Thus, virosomes are not infectious and easy to produce and might serve as vaccine candidates.

Perspectives

Professor Stefan Pöhlmann
German Primate Center

It will be interesting to determine whether other highly pathogenic viruses also release virosomes to lead the immune system astray. Moreover, our findings have implications for the development of novel antiviral strategies. Thus, virosomes are not infectious and easy to produce and might serve as vaccine candidates.

Read Publication

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2019.01.065

The following have contributed to this page: Professor Stefan Pöhlmann