Perceptions of quality and approaches to studying in higher education: a comparative study of Chinese and British postgraduate students at six British business schools

Haoda Sun, John T. E. Richardson
  • Higher Education, June 2011, Springer Science + Business Media
  • DOI: 10.1007/s10734-011-9442-y

Perceptions of quality and approaches to studying in higher education: a comparative study

What is it about?

Previous studies of “the Chinese learner” have confounded the effects of culture and context or have used heterogeneous samples of students. In this study, 134 British students and 207 students from mainland China following one-year postgraduate programmes at six British business schools completed the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) and the Revised Approaches to Studying Inventory (RASI). The two groups yielded the same factor structure on both instruments.

Why is it important?

The present findings suggest that teachers at UK universities need to avoid making pedagogical assumptions based on stereotypes of “the Chinese learner”. Rather than taking the simplistic view that Chinese students’ approaches to studying are culturally determined, they need to recognise the variety of contextual factors that affect these students’ capacity to adapt to living and learning at British universities.

The following have contributed to this page: Professor Haoda Sun